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  • Teach Yoga to Teens

    The TeenYoga Teaching Yoga and Mindfulness to Teens Course provides it’s graduates with a deep understanding of teenage psychology and physiology, enabling you to effectively teach yoga and mindfulness to teens.

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  • Find a TeenYoga Teacher

    Our TeenYoga Course gradutes are a community of highly skilled and motivated providers of yoga and mindfulness classes to teenagers. Find a teacher near you via our teacher directory.

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  • Attend a TeenYoga Event

    TeenYoga runs global events including the TeenYoga Teacher Training Course, TeenYoga Retreats, Conference Days and Short Courses. View and book a place on an event near you.

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Welcome to TeenYoga!

TeenYoga provides training enabling you to teach yoga and mindfulness to teens. TeenYoga is fully accredited by Yoga Alliance UK and Independent Yoga Network established in 2004. It is an international course, with offices in Australia, Abu Dhabi and South Africa. There are bursaries available for the training, please enquire. The course is directed especially towards professionals working with this age group. We also tailor courses for groups according to your needs.

We support the charity TeenYoga Foundation, whose aim is to support optimal mental and physical well being in young people. View more on the Teen Yoga Course and download the prospectus here.

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We want schools to have a whole-school approach that makes talking about feelings, emotions and wellbeing as normal for pupils as talking about their physical bodies. That might include lessons taught as part of the PSHE curriculum, whole-school programmes such as mindfulness that become a normal part of the school day, role play in drama lessons, or offering meditation or yoga sessions.

Edward Timpson MP, Minister for Vulnerable Children and Families, mindfulness in schools debate, House of Commons, 6/9/16

Yoga off the mat

When I hear of the students in Bath supporting their lecturers, I reflect on the first principles of yoga. Since the referendum to leave the European Union, the voice of young people has become more succinct. After what feels like decades of silence, it seems that this generation is engaging more in politics and the future of our country.

Having worked with young people throughout my life, I am often aware of how disempowered they feel in the light of decisions made regarding them and their own future. It strikes me that these honourable qualities of compassion, justice, hope and solidarity indicate a vitality many of us lack due to years of contraction, cynicism and fear. To stand up for what you believe in, shoulder to shoulder with others who feel they have been treated unfairly takes courage and insight and can be a timely reminder to the rest of us to reach towards an expanded awareness of justice for all.

At the heart of yoga lies ten guiding principles, which are often overlooked, including compassion, truth, discipline, contentment, purity, devotion to higher principles.

The yoga practise encourages us to act from these ideals within a framework of self-care. When we act from a place of ahimsa (compassion) – which is the first principle of yoga –  our expression will be gentle and support the greater good.  In a society that mostly encourages comparison, consumerism and rampant egoism, it is refreshing to know that there is a current flowing in the opposite direction, expanding us towards compassion and solidarity.

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BBC Thought for the Day

Teenagers are rowdy, vital, mischievous and give us a run for our money. Their task is to differentiate themselves from adults in order to belong to a group that defines them. This task needs to be met with respect and support, so that they can learn to become responsible adults. When young people misbehave, we feel the need to punish them. When little kids act out, we find ways of controlling or mitigating their behaviour. But teens are bigger, noisier and can seem more threatening. Many teenagers become rowdy because they are feeling upset, insecure, or they want to impress their friends or test the boundaries of carers and other adults who are there to protect and guide them.

Yoga teaches us compassion, it teaches us to embody what we want to see in others. If we want to see tolerant, respectful, responsible citizens, we need to embody that in the way we deal with them. We need to attempt to understand their behaviour and go beyond the chaotic exterior. Many young people are suffering from anxiety and other debilitating mental health issues and they turn to us and ask – help us to help ourselves. In my experience as a school teacher and teacher trainer, I feel we are not doing enough to support young people to navigate their emotions and find an equilibrium in a judgmental and rapidly changing world. We need to find calm and we need to teach young people to find calm, to find a space where they can breathe, relax and let go.

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The introduction of yoga to the teens of the UK is the best introduction to the whole journey of life I have seen in a long time. A wonderful inspiration.

Vicky, Yoga Teacher, London

Charlotta, the course lead and founder of TeenYoga is truly an inspiration. The great depth of her knowledge, insight and experience is far surpassed by her powerfully generous, honest and humble heart. Charlotta shares her vision with such contagious love, light and joy, that it ignites a fervent empathy for our current generation of adolescents. Leaving each of us eager to play our part in bringing about the revolution of sharing the liberating and nurturing gift of yoga. The TeenYoga training was life changing and life affirming, words could never do justice to the acute wisdom of the course tutors and students, and the unique and mighty intimacy we found in each other.

Naomi, Mental Health Worker, 2014

I am very excited about teaching yoga at the school where I am a classroom teacher. I can see how enormously beneficial yoga is going to be for the young people in my school, especially in the run up to exams when the pressure is enormous.

Emma, Secondary Teacher, Berkhamsted

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