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  • Teach Yoga to Teens

    The TeenYoga Teaching Yoga and Mindfulness to Teens Course provides it’s graduates with a deep understanding of teenage psychology and physiology, enabling you to effectively teach yoga and mindfulness to teens.

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    Our TeenYoga Course gradutes are a community of highly skilled and motivated providers of yoga and mindfulness classes to teenagers. Find a teacher near you via our teacher directory.

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    TeenYoga runs global events including the TeenYoga Teacher Training Course, TeenYoga Retreats, Conference Days and Short Courses. View and book a place on an event near you.

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Welcome to TeenYoga!

TeenYoga provides training enabling you to teach yoga and mindfulness to teens. TeenYoga is fully accredited by Yoga Alliance UK and Independent Yoga Network established in 2004. It is an international course, with offices in Australia, Abu Dhabi and South Africa. There are bursaries available for the training, please enquire. The course is directed especially towards professionals working with this age group. We also tailor courses for groups according to your needs.

We support the charity TeenYoga Foundation, whose aim is to support optimal mental and physical well being in young people. View more on the Teen Yoga Course and download the prospectus here.

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We want schools to have a whole-school approach that makes talking about feelings, emotions and wellbeing as normal for pupils as talking about their physical bodies. That might include lessons taught as part of the PSHE curriculum, whole-school programmes such as mindfulness that become a normal part of the school day, role play in drama lessons, or offering meditation or yoga sessions.

Edward Timpson MP, Minister for Vulnerable Children and Families, mindfulness in schools debate, House of Commons, 6/9/16

GAINING MOMENTUM

GAINING MOMENTUM

 

Yesterday was the 4th International Yoga Day and all over the world, yoga was being practised and celebrated in various ways. I spent the day at the House of COmmons at the APPG on yoga in society, where i found myself pinching myself again and again at the incredible steps we are taking towards the acceptance of yoga as a healthcare initiatave and as support in education.

Theorists say that an idea goes from Ridicule to Rejection to Acceptance. Any of us who have worked in yoga in education or even yoga in general can bear testimony to this. In the 70s Yoga was seen as cultish and hippie, in the 90s it became fashionable among the cognoscenti and today it is being rolled out in all areas of society with government getting on board. Yesterday at the House of Commons, I was invited again to participate in a meeting for the APPG on Yoga at which I represent the Education vertical.

Listening to the peers and experts speaking about yoga and yoga in schools in particular, it is clear that we are at the beginning of a burgeoning surge in interest for yoga. Julie Montagu spoke eloquently about the importance of bringing yoga to everyone as she shared her personal journey from anguish to joy and went on to reiterate the importance of using social media to bring awareness to the general public.

Dr Justin Varney, who works in Public Health outlined the criteria for bringing yoga into the Health Service in a meaningful way. He reiterated that the research on yoga is fundamental and that in 2007 there were only a few meaningful research papers and today there are around 400 research papers being produced every year.  This indicates that there is a rise in interest and serious enquiry into the effects and supposed effects of yoga.  Josefin from Sweden gave us an overview of yoga in Prisons all over the world, from Mexico to India and Sweden.  She gave us some beautiful quotes from prisoners who felt their violence and anger drop away in yoga, positing that the re-offending statistics could drop significantly if many continued with yoga outside of prison, thereby saving countries money and saving lives.

Preaching to the converted, around 100 yogis sat smiling and content that finally what they knew all along was being explored and expressed, namely that yoga brings peace and when practiced extensively could potentially change the heart of our nation, bringing it to joy.

As head of the Education vertical in the APPG, I feel the importance of bringing a solid and unflinching cohesion to the community of yoga teachers working in schools or with children outside of school so that we speak with one voice clearly and concisely, working together in solidarity. When we report to government in this way, our voice wil be heard loud and clear and acted upon without hesitation.  This is a call to all kids’ yoga teachers to come together in harmony and move in the same direction, to bring yoga to young people all across the UK in an optimistic, simple and compassionate way. I believe that yoga in schools and for kids could be the answer to so many issues that we are tackling today: obesity, anxiety, disembodiment (and all that that entails) and failing schools. Mindfulness has paved the way and the UK has been a long-term innovator in society, so let’s lead the world in this vision of yoga for children as a way to bring harmony, authenticity and joy to our kids and for our future. Maybe the yoga community could model a new way of leadership, that supports and empowers, that listens and brings together and that moves as one, adhering in this way to the fundamental principles of yoga.  


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Thought for the Day

Many young people are preparing for exams now – whether it is end of year, GCSEs, A Levels, or Uni exams. Yoga is well known to combat stress. In one study we did together with the CBeebies, cortisol (the stress hormone in the body) dropped by 30% at the end of the class, but more interestingly, the whole class started with a 20% lower cortisol rate than the control groups. This means that week on week, your stress is reducing and the benefits are cumulative.

1 – when we stretch our body, we are indicating to our brain that we are relaxed as a stressed body is a tense body.

2 – when we breathe deeply, we activate the baroreceptors in our lungs which tell the body to relax

3 – when we turn ourselves upside down, the heart gets to relax as it no longer needs to pull the blood back up from the bottom of the body

4 – we focus on one thing, the breath or a mantra, in order to train the brain to be strong and not wander or ruminate, which is the basis of so much anxiety. To be able to focus, brings success in any field.

5 – Philosophically – we distinguish between what is real and what is unreal. We look at our lives and we see it in a philosophical perspective, where we are no longer at the centre, but just someone who is learning lessons, whatever they are – this brings us into a more detached mode of thinking.

So when you get home, lie down and pop your legs up the wall and breathe deeply. Make sure your outbreath is longer than your in breath for about 15 to 20 minutes and you will soon feel a difference.

Good Luck!

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The introduction of yoga to the teens of the UK is the best introduction to the whole journey of life I have seen in a long time. A wonderful inspiration.

Vicky, Yoga Teacher, London

Charlotta, the course lead and founder of TeenYoga is truly an inspiration. The great depth of her knowledge, insight and experience is far surpassed by her powerfully generous, honest and humble heart. Charlotta shares her vision with such contagious love, light and joy, that it ignites a fervent empathy for our current generation of adolescents. Leaving each of us eager to play our part in bringing about the revolution of sharing the liberating and nurturing gift of yoga. The TeenYoga training was life changing and life affirming, words could never do justice to the acute wisdom of the course tutors and students, and the unique and mighty intimacy we found in each other.

Naomi, Mental Health Worker, 2014

I am very excited about teaching yoga at the school where I am a classroom teacher. I can see how enormously beneficial yoga is going to be for the young people in my school, especially in the run up to exams when the pressure is enormous.

Emma, Secondary Teacher, Berkhamsted

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