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  • Teach Yoga to Teens

    The TeenYoga Teaching Yoga and Mindfulness to Teens Course provides it’s graduates with a deep understanding of teenage psychology and physiology, enabling you to effectively teach yoga and mindfulness to teens.

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  • Find a TeenYoga Teacher

    Our TeenYoga Course gradutes are a community of highly skilled and motivated providers of yoga and mindfulness classes to teenagers. Find a teacher near you via our teacher directory.

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  • Attend a TeenYoga Event

    TeenYoga runs global events including the TeenYoga Teacher Training Course, TeenYoga Retreats, Conference Days and Short Courses. View and book a place on an event near you.

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Welcome to TeenYoga!

TeenYoga provides training enabling you to teach yoga and mindfulness to teens. TeenYoga is fully accredited by Yoga Alliance UK and Independent Yoga Network established in 2004. It is an international course, with offices in Australia, Abu Dhabi and South Africa. There are bursaries available for the training, please enquire. The course is directed especially towards professionals working with this age group. We also tailor courses for groups according to your needs.

We support the charity TeenYoga Foundation, whose aim is to support optimal mental and physical well being in young people. View more on the Teen Yoga Course and download the prospectus here.

Get our TeenYoga news

We want schools to have a whole-school approach that makes talking about feelings, emotions and wellbeing as normal for pupils as talking about their physical bodies. That might include lessons taught as part of the PSHE curriculum, whole-school programmes such as mindfulness that become a normal part of the school day, role play in drama lessons, or offering meditation or yoga sessions.

Edward Timpson MP, Minister for Vulnerable Children and Families, mindfulness in schools debate, House of Commons, 6/9/16

BBC Thought for the Day

Teenagers are rowdy, vital, mischievous and give us a run for our money. Their task is to differentiate themselves from adults in order to belong to a group that defines them. This task needs to be met with respect and support, so that they can learn to become responsible adults. When young people misbehave, we feel the need to punish them. When little kids act out, we find ways of controlling or mitigating their behaviour. But teens are bigger, noisier and can seem more threatening. Many teenagers become rowdy because they are feeling upset, insecure, or they want to impress their friends or test the boundaries of carers and other adults who are there to protect and guide them.

Yoga teaches us compassion, it teaches us to embody what we want to see in others. If we want to see tolerant, respectful, responsible citizens, we need to embody that in the way we deal with them. We need to attempt to understand their behaviour and go beyond the chaotic exterior. Many young people are suffering from anxiety and other debilitating mental health issues and they turn to us and ask – help us to help ourselves. In my experience as a school teacher and teacher trainer, I feel we are not doing enough to support young people to navigate their emotions and find an equilibrium in a judgmental and rapidly changing world. We need to find calm and we need to teach young people to find calm, to find a space where they can breathe, relax and let go.

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Belonging

Hearts come home at Christmas – embroidered delicately on one of my Christmas decorations, made me ponder, made me reflect on belonging.  It has come up a lot for me recently. My father died a few years ago, my sister lives far away as does my mum, my boys are slowly leaving home and I divorced their father ten years ago, I was born in Africa and my mum is Swedish. I was brought up in London and live in Somerset. At a time when ex-patriots are being sent back from the USA and the UK as well as many other countries, the march of nationalism begs the urgent question – where do I belong?

I live in a Somerset village where there are two or three dominant surnames echoing among the hills and rooted deep in the clay of the earth. Families belong to the land, memories are tied to the land, its changes and how it has served them through generations.

On the occasion of my 50th birthday I felt literally drawn to the place of my birth, Kitwe Zambia – I took a bus to the hospital where 50 years earlier I was born. I wanted to enter, find the room, find the doctor and find the time when I came into this world and landed on this red, hot earth which hides diamonds, rubies and emeralds.

I felt a strange longing, a subtle recognition of the smells of bodies, dried fish, earth and other unperceived and unnamed objects and wafts on the wind. I felt I belonged, a white face among black, a privileged woman among those who had never travelled, never worked and never seen what I had seen. I belonged.

I watch my mother flying back to Sweden as soon as she can, having lost her anchor, my father, her boat steers her home, where her heart is – the land she recognises, the language that flows easily from her tongue, the subtle social hints that belong to her.

I watch my son return from university and nestle in his boyhood room, with his cat in his space, where he belongs, his internal sat nav draws him inexorably home.

We move, we uproot ourselves, we travel, we change partners and even families. The subtlety of belonging is lost.

Lonely and adrift, we search for belonging in community. Somehow, we got lost in the understanding that we can relocate, break up, start again, lose someone and just carry on, recreating our belonging again and again.  I detect a brutalisation of our needs and wants, a brutalisation of the subtler aspects of being human which are connected to being joyful, safe and feeling necessary.

We seek refuge in the oasis of belonging.

Since 2007 I have been creating communities, first here in the village, a yoga and wellbeing community, then nationally, with retreats and now globally, we create communities of teenyoga teachers, who come together to celebrate the empowerment of our future leaders through yoga. Because I’ve discovered that to belong is to feel joy.

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Twitter Feed

Young people are the lightning rod for the zeitgeist of our time

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last day of the Manchester TeenYoga course, always a sweet melancholy as i leave these beautiful...

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Here are our runners for the Bath Half Marathon, if you want to give back to the Teen Yoga...

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i am proud to be invited to participate in what seems to be a very thorough training addressing...

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The introduction of yoga to the teens of the UK is the best introduction to the whole journey of life I have seen in a long time. A wonderful inspiration.

Vicky, Yoga Teacher, London

Charlotta, the course lead and founder of TeenYoga is truly an inspiration. The great depth of her knowledge, insight and experience is far surpassed by her powerfully generous, honest and humble heart. Charlotta shares her vision with such contagious love, light and joy, that it ignites a fervent empathy for our current generation of adolescents. Leaving each of us eager to play our part in bringing about the revolution of sharing the liberating and nurturing gift of yoga. The TeenYoga training was life changing and life affirming, words could never do justice to the acute wisdom of the course tutors and students, and the unique and mighty intimacy we found in each other.

Naomi, Mental Health Worker, 2014

I am very excited about teaching yoga at the school where I am a classroom teacher. I can see how enormously beneficial yoga is going to be for the young people in my school, especially in the run up to exams when the pressure is enormous.

Emma, Secondary Teacher, Berkhamsted

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